Symposium

The very concept of what constitutes ‘heritage’ has witnessed a profound transformation in recent decades, a trend that is set to continue. This is set against a background of profound changes to society, the economy, technology and the environment. How these drivers will influence cultural heritage in the coming decades, and how heritage site managers can adapt to such changes are underlying themes of this symposium.

Heritage sites are facing an unprecedented threat. The long-term erosion of funding sources coupled with the current economic climate has the potential to change the heritage landscape. Heritage sites and their managers are coming under increasing pressure from funders to measure their benefit to society, to add value to their offerings and to increase self-sustainability. All this comes at a time when resources for assessing impact are under threat and the scope of impact becomes ever more diverse. And yet, as ever, there is little evidence for the impact of heritage on the community and society.

The Future of Heritage 2016 symposium brings together speakers from three continents to explore the meaning and value of heritage, strategies for sustainability and how societal, economic, technological and environmental changes are likely to influence heritage in the coming decades. The symposium will bring together theoretical, conceptual and practical perspectives and provide a bridge between academic and practitioner viewpoints. The Future of Heritage 2016 will provide an opportunity for key stakeholders – practitioners, academics, policy makers, heritage strategists, heritage technologists and marketing professionals – to share and shape the latest thinking on the direction of heritage studies.

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Programme

Thursday October 20, 2016
Registration (12.30)
13.00–17.00

KEYNOTE

What is heritage? Misunderstandings as future challenges
Professor John Tunbridge
Carleton University, Canada

Academic concepts may encounter misrepresentation and misinterpretation from their inception through the processes of their appraisal, adoption and application, in the literature and, more broadly, in life. Misunderstandings thus engendered inevitably bear upon the future impact of such concepts, whether to impede, modify or, conceivably, creatively enhance their intellectual contribution. This presentation considers conceptual misinterpretations relating to heritage, of its dissonant, ‘authorised’ and critical dimensions; and, ultimately, alleged misunderstandings of the very meaning of heritage itself as an intellectual concept. In light of this discussion, the question is necessarily posed: what do such misunderstandings imply for heritage futures?

The diverse and changing value and values of heritage: An “Antiques Roadshow” perspective
Professor Roy Jones
Curtin University, Australia

On the “Antiques Roadshow” the ‘value at auction’ of any piece often bears little relationship to the worth of that piece to owners who, for personal reasons, would ‘never sell it’. Frequently heritage managers face a similar dilemma when they are called upon to preserve and conserve the ‘stuff’ (heritage objects, buildings and sites) for and even by communities for whom ‘the meaning (and therefore the value) of the stuff’ is varied and/or disputed. This presentation will draw on examples from Hardy Country in Dorset, UK, and of settler-Indigenous disputes in the city centres of Perth, Australia, and Ottawa, Canada, to illustrate the challenges faced by those tasked with managing valuable heritage ‘stuff’ in situations where diverse stakeholders ascribe very different meanings – and therefore very different values – to the heritage ‘stuff’ in question.

Future landscape heritage – a divisive force?
Professor Peter Howard
Bournemouth University, UK

To understand future changes of heritage protection, we need to understand past trajectories that brought us here. In England the drive towards the conservation of heritage was clearly driven by the obsession with attractive landscape. The Kinder Scout trespass highlighted the political nature of this, and there are many examples of the left-wing intellectual demand for the conservation of many tracts of countryside, most especially the moorlands. Not surprisingly it was the Atlee government that acted on this; and it was not so many years later that AONBs were also designated. Was it intended or even foreseen that they would become, like all heritage, the property of the wealthy? Blacksell and Gilg noticed this in the late 1960s, and nowadays any estate agent will admit to the premium added to any property in Protected Landscape.
National Parks were focused on moorland, AONBs on rural villages and downland. There were political issues here, but also there was an historic continuity. The moorlands had risen to artistic favour in the 1870s and by the 1930s were universally regarded as attractive, and also easily accessed. The English village became an artistic icon much later, in the 1920s, so powered the later move to protecting places such as the South Downs and the Chilterns. The uplands were steadily drained of the original inhabitants, and later the villages also. Consulting the local population now meant a meeting with graduate educated, wealthy, often retired people, if they were not abroad at the time. They entirely approved of conservation, not having their income within the parish, and were quite happy to play a role as costumed guides.
The story does give a glimpse into the future, as there seems some reason to suppose that what has happened in England is now spreading throughout the Continent, often with the help of those same English middle-classes in their foreign hideaways. In England we now have ‘landscapes’, which are protected carefully for their wealthy inhabitants, where there will be no wind farms, nor fracking, and mere ‘places’, where all the detritus of modern civilisation can be dumped. Not only is heritage for the rich, but it can play a significant part, as Hewison recognised in the 1970s, in a jingoistic appraisal of their country, hence dividing continents.

Strategic partnerships and co-value creation – the case of the National Museum of Cinema, Turin, Italy
Jim McLoughlin
CUBIST Research Group, University of Brighton Business School, UK

This paper aims to analyse how innovative strategic partnerships can enable co-value creation consistent with the distinct values, objectives and stakeholder expectations of the collaborating organisations. The paper will employ case study methodology focusing on the network strategic activities of the National Museum of Cinema (NMC) in Turin, Italy. From the applied strategic NMC case study analysis a conceptual framework of networked value creation has been developed for testing as a potential tool for heritage strategic management development. A linked challenge in assessing the effectiveness of the networked strategies is: how do we know that there has been value creation attributable to the identified strategies? In other words, how do we measure such complex value creation? For a social mission driven organisation like the NMC traditional private sector focused valuation models do not work well. This challenge is addressed by presenting a strategic and social performance measurement model which itself was derived from numerous previous case studies, including the NMC, in the social enterprise sector, and particularly the cultural heritage sector. Various notions of value in social performance evaluation will be considered through the conceptual construct of the quadruple bottom line and, finally, different meanings of Capital will be raised. Can lessons from the heritage sector be transferable to the wider capitalist system?

Future directions for Intangible Cultural Heritage
Dr Begona Sanchez Royo
University of Brighton, UK

Intangible cultural heritage is broadly defined as ‘the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, skills – as well as the instruments, objects, artefacts and cultural spaces associated therewith – that communities, groups and, in some cases, individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage.’ Awareness of Intangible Cultural Heritage has increased markedly since the ‘Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage’ was ratified by UNESCO in 2003 but it brings its own challenges. This presentation will consider how the protection and preservation of intangible cultural heritage may develop in the future.

The 'heritagisation' of popular music - Current practices and new challenges
Alcina Cortez , INETmd, Lisbon, Portugal

In recent years, there have been several social and cultural developments that have encouraged an understanding of popular music as intangible heritage by museums worldwide - most of all is the ratification by UNESCO of its Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2003. Meanwhile, the digital revolution in the music industry has simultaneously motivated very current debates on the ethical, aesthetical and philosophical dimensions to sound-related phenomena within the realms of several overlapping academic fields, such as science and technology studies, and, most significantly, popular music studies, ethnomusicology, and sound studies. Within this framework, museums and temporary exhibitions specifically assigned to the subject of popular music have started to develop around the world. As to the scholarly reflections about these initiatives, in general terms they clearly demonstrate its discursive routes to lack representational adequacy when posed in the light of the research stemming from anthropology, ethnomusicology, popular music studies and sound studies. In this paper, I will provide an overview of the current practice of the popular music heritagisation across three main parameters of discussion - the representation of the phenomena; the museum relationship with its visitors; and the exhibiting practices – and will tentatively envision further avenues for the practice to become of heightened cultural and social relevance.

The future of cultural heritage in Libya
Dr Hafed Walda
Kings College London, UK 

Libya’s cultural resources have been under a great deal of strain both before and during the current Libyan crisis. The Department of Antiquities (DoA) was weakened by the current crisis due to the lack of security, inadequate funding, wide spread use of arms and internal divisions. A great deal of cultural property has been lost due to destruction, urban encroachment and land grabs. The heritage institutions are doing their utmost to protect museums and the many sites. These efforts are being hindered by a lack of awareness of the heritage and a lack of discipline in the security forces.




Friday 21 October, 2016
(9.30–16.00)

Archives in the digital world – opportunities and challenges for the sector
Professor Janet Delve
E-ARK coordinator, UK

Archives are one mechanism by which the material culture of the past can be preserved for future generations. Like many other areas of the heritage sector archives are beginning to be influenced by the digital world. This however, brings both opportunities and challenges. Using data derived from research in archives across Europe this paper will consider how archives have adapted to digital working and what implications this may have for the future.

Using heritage: Archives in the commercial world, the benefits for new products
James Stevenson
Cultural Heritage Digitisation Ltd, UK

One of the consequences of being the first industrial nation is that there a large number of UK companies which have been in existence for a long time. Many old and established companies have often retained their company records and archives, sometimes as a policy, sometimes by accident. For many craft based manufacturers their archives reflect the continuity of their products. By converting them to a digital medium the use of these archives can be extended to enhance new product ranges for the future. This talk will illustrate a few examples where archives are being used for contemporary commercial activities.

Is the future of museums post-digital?
Kevin Bacon
Digital Manager at Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove, UK

As digital activity becomes embedded in everyday museum practice, do we need to rethink what digital means? This presentation will look at emerging trends in the museum sector which suggest that we may need to move beyond the current established rhetoric of digital. It will also look at some of the Royal Pavilion & Museums’ work in developing digital products and skills that attempt to look beyond technology.

Are we facing a digital dark age?
Professor David Anderson
University of Brighton, UK

The growth in accessible digitised primary source materials, together with the improvement in quantity and quality of online research tools, and the reams of data they produce, has changed fundamentally the way in which the heritage community operates. While the fundamental importance of primary sources remains the same, it is ever more the case that the sources themselves were born digital, consumed digitally and (hopefully) preserved digitally. But what assurance do we have that in the next century, or the next millennium, historians will be able to access materials which were produced on machines, and software packages which have long ceased to exist?

Planning for sustainability: The case of heritage in Bath, UK
Stephen Bird
Bath and North East Somerset Council, UK

Many local authorities have outsourced their museums as a way of freeing them up to behave more commercially. Bath and North East Somerset Council has taken a different approach, setting up its Heritage Services department as an internal business unit with financial freedoms not granted to other Council services. This paper looks at its business model, how it is applied to ensure sustainability going forward and what threats and opportunities await it over the next five years.

Future perspectives on heritage tourism
Dr Jaime Kaminski
Cultural Informatics Research Group, Brighton, UK

The desire to travel to experience cultural heritage is not new, but the scale and nature of that activity has changed markedly since the 1950s. Such changes have been driven by accelerating societal and technological developments coupled with a continual extension of what constitutes heritage. Such a state of flux will continue into the future. Security, economy, demographics and climate change all cast a long shadow over heritage tourism. This presentation will consider how such global phenomena are likely to influence tourism to heritage sites in the coming decades.

Heritage Futures – scenarios, strategies and showstoppers
Professor Ian Baxter, Director of Scottish Confucius Institute for Business & Communication, Heriot-Watt University) & Professor of Historic Environment Management, University of Suffolk

Despite heritage organisations large and small having to engage with changing governance, economic and service development issues amongst a myriad of other business environment drivers, engagement with the role of management itself, and research into organisational studies issues by the sector is sparse. Is this because one of heritage’s wicked problems – the difficulty of reconciling ‘for ever, for everyone’ and uncertain operational economics is too thorny an issue to grapple with? Using case studies from different organisations and aspects of management such as strategy and scenario planning, the provocation will wonder why we aren’t properly exploring the management in heritage management.

KEYNOTE

The heritage crusade: Have we won or lost?
Professor Gregory Ashworth
The University of Groningen, The Netherlands

In 1996 David Lowenthal published The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History with the implicit idea of chronicling a triumphalist crusade that began as a weak minority protest against cultural destruction but within a generation had swept all before it to a victory that left only the problems of success. However, have we really won?
From its nineteenth century beginnings the imperative practice of saving superseded any weak to non-existent theoretical concerns with a pervading assumption of self-evident truth. Similarly the process of ‘heritagisation’ necessarily involved numerous quite different activities leading to a fragmentation of approaches. Third, governments at all jurisdictional scales enthusiastically grasped the importance of an almost total nationalisation of the past to serve various official objectives. Finally, academics from a wide array of disciplines climbed aboard the clearly outstandingly successful heritage bandwagon. Heritage had become a vast ill-demarcated, poorly thought out, amorphous mass of almost anything applied for almost any purpose. The crusade has clearly been lost.
However, on closer examination there are still glimmerings of hope, or wishful thinking, that not all is lost and something worthwhile may yet be salvaged from the formless mess that is contemporary heritage practice. Much of the heritage world is dominated by the public activities and pompous pronouncements of governments. But is anyone listening? Has heritage become just governments talking to themselves, leaving a subversive popular counter-heritage with its own unofficial means of expression to remind us that heritage is individual and personal more than public and collective? Finally, in 2012 a small group of academics concerned about this situation of formlessness and directionless established the Association of Critical Heritage Studies, with the subject of the criticism being governments and their self-centred abuses of pasts.
Have the futures for heritage become as fragmented as its present? Is it to be an amorphous mass of undifferentiated praxis with no agreed consensus on theory determining form and direction? Or is it sets of mutual solitudes, misunderstandings and empty meeting grounds?

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Speaker Biographies



Professor Gregory Ashworth

The University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Professor Gregory Ashworth was educated at St John’s College, Cambridge (BA), University of Reading (MPhil) and Birkbeck College, University of London (PhD). He has taught at the University of Wales, the University of Portsmouth and the University of Groningen. Since 1994, Gregory has held the position of Professor of Heritage Management and Urban Tourism in the Department of Planning, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands. His main academic interests revolve around heritage management, a topic on which he has published extensively. His publications include: The City in West Europe (Wiley, 1981); The Tourist-Historic City (Wiley, 1990); Heritage Planning (Geopers, 1992); Building a New Heritage: Tourism, Culture and Identity in the New Europe (Routledge, 1994); Dissonant Heritage (Wiley, 1996); European Heritage Planning and Management (Intellect, 2001); A Geography of Heritage (Arnold, 2001); Senses of Place: Senses of Time (Ashgate, 2005); Marketing Tourism Places (Routledge, 1990); Tourism and Spatial Transformation (CABI, 1996) and Place Marketing ‘Selling the City’ (Wiley, 1990).

Professor John Tunbridge

Carleton University, Canada

Professor John Tunbridge is a graduate of St John’s College, Cambridge and received his PhD from Bristol University. By way of Sheffield University, he joined Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada in 1969 and has since taught in Australia, the UK and South Africa. He retired as Professor Emeritus in 2008 and has since held visiting positions at Brighton and Curtin (Perth, Australia) Universities. He is, inter alia, co-author of The Tourist-Historic City (London: Belhaven, 1990 and Elsevier, 2000), Dissonant Heritage (Chichester: Wiley, 1996), A Geography of Heritage (London: Arnold, 2000) and Pluralising Pasts (London: Pluto, 2007). His research is concerned with many aspects of the geography of heritage and associated tourism.

Professor Roy Jones

Curtin University, Australia

Roy Jones, PhD (Manchester) is an Emeritus Professor of Geography at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia where he has worked since 1970. He is an historical geographer with a particular interest in heritage and tourism and the influences that they exert on urban and rural change and development. He has authored or co-authored over 100 refereed publications including the Australian chapter in The Ashgate Research Companion to Heritage and Identity and the ‘Heritage and Culture’ entry in The Elsevier Encyclopaedia of Human Geography. In 2013, he was awarded a Distinguished Fellowship of the Institute of Australian Geographers.

Professor Peter Howard

Bournemouth University, UK

Peter Howard was trained as a geographer in Newcastle in the 1960s. Later he accepted an unusual post in Exeter College of Art, teaching and researching landscape with artists and designers. His main research was focused on showing how artists’ preferred landscapes had changed over time, and this was published in Landscapes: the Artists' Vision. As the art college merged with Plymouth University in the 1990s he expanded his landscape interest into broader heritage matters, publishing Heritage in 2003 and co-editing The Ashgate Research Companion to Heritage and Identity in 2008. On his retirement he accepted a Professorship with Bournemouth University and has been much involved with the Landscape Research Group and the European Landscape Convention (see An Introduction to Landscape 2011, and the co-edited Routledge Companion to Landscape Studies). He spent his spare time editing Landscape Research for a decade, and later founding the new International Journal of Heritage Studies, which he edited for 13 years. Now he watches birds in Devon.

Dr Begona Sanchez Royo

University of Brighton, UK

Dr Begona Sanchez Royo is a Marie Sklodowska Curie Research Fellow specializing in the impact of intangible cultural heritage. She has conducted socio-economic impact studies across Spain including La Palma, the Province of Alicante and Valencia. Begoña has advised on Intangible cultural heritage nomination proposals for inclusion on UNESCO’s Intangible World Heritage List. She has a PhD ‘Sobresaliente Cum Laude’ and ‘Doctor Europeus’ from the Polytechnic University of Valencia which focused on the impact of intangible cultural heritage. She has a degree in Economics from the University of Valencia, and is an accredited Economist.

Professor Janet Delve

E-ARK coordinator, UK

Professor Delve has been researching the Digital Humanities for 20 years, especially in the areas of humanities data warehousing (Big Data), database archiving, the history of computing and the history of mathematics. She works with national archives, libraries, museums and galleries (the GLAM sector), helping them curate and preserve their digital material, such as digital art, computer games, relational databases, 3D models / visualisations / simulations of archaeological data. She is the Co-ordinator of the EC project E-ARK which comprises 17 partners: five national archives, five research institutions, three SMEs, two government departments and two membership organisations. E-ARK is an FP7 Policy Support Programme Competiveness and Innovation Pilot B Project which involves setting up a digital archiving infrastructure together with the accompanying specifications, methodologies, processes, tools and services. E-ARK is confronting the challenge of archiving a range of digital data, from databases and Electronic Records Management Systems (ERMSs) to single files. The project outputs are available as Open Source tools and systems, and of key interest are the openly accessible metadata specifications for getting data into and out of an archive (and also staying there).

Alcina Cortez

Alcina Cortez, INETmd, Lisbon, Portugal

Alcina Cortez is the Head of Research and Development of Moment, Museum of Music and Entertainment in New York. She has a longstanding experience as an executive producer of exhibitions, mainly at Calouste Gulbenkian foundation, Lisbon, Portugal and Expo’98, Lisbon. A Musicologist graduated from Universidade Nova de Lisboa, she holds a Master’s degree in Ethnomusicology and Museum Studies focusing on the heritagisation of popular music and is now working on her PhD, which aims at developing the heritagisation of music by drawing on notions of sonic epistemologies. She runs the blog www.objectsofsound.com in which she shares her thoughts on the exhibitions and museums focusing music and sound. The blog was jury-selected by the publisher MuseumsETC to integrate the upcoming publication The Blog Book, which shows the publisher’s selection of the best blogs on museum studies. She has published in significant journals, presented profusely in scientific conferences, and been invited to give talks worldwide.

Professor David Anderson

University of Brighton, UK

David is Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Brighton, UK. He has a particular interest in digital preservation and has managed numerous projects including, most recently, the European Commission KEEP project, and the JISC, POCOS project. He is a member of the Arts and Humanities Research Council Peer Review College and a project reviewer for JISC. In addition he served on the European Commission Expert Advisory Panel on European Industrial Leadership in ICT (2011), and the European Commission Expert Advisory Panel on Preservation Planning (2011). He has held numerous committee memberships within Humanities Computing including serving on the IEEE History of Computing Editorial Board, and Chair of the International Federation of Information Processing (IFIP) Working Group 9.7 (History of Computing). He is the Editor in Chief of the New Review of Information Networking (Taylor & Francis).

Stephen Bird

Bath and North East Somerset Council, UK

Stephen Bird is Head of Heritage Services with Bath and North East Somerset Council. He has established Heritage Services as a business unit within the Council, working to a rolling five-year business plan and an innovative business model. His department includes the Roman Baths and Pump Room, Assembly Rooms and Fashion Museum, Victoria Art Gallery, Bath Record Office and Circus Georgian Garden and the collections care, exhibitions, study facilities and the learning programmes that take place within them. He also oversees the visitor management activities essential in a major tourism destination, facilities management, security and the commercial operations of museum shops, corporate hospitality and catering. Stephen represents the Roman Baths and Pump Room at the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions (ALVA), is a trustee of The Roman Society and of Glastonbury Abbey and sits on the Advisory Board of the Alexander Keiller Museum, Avebury. From 1989 to 2005 he served as Company Secretary of Bath Archaeological Trust and is currently Company Secretary of the Roman Baths Foundation. He was a Board member of the Museums Libraries and Archives Council (South West) and is a past President of the South Western Federation of Museums and Art Galleries.

Jim McLoughlin

CUBIST Research Group, University of Brighton Business School, UK

Jim is a member of the CUBIST Research Group, Brighton Business School, University of Brighton and a Principal Lecturer in Strategic Management and Economics. His research on strategy and socio-economic impact has focused on heritage, social enterprises, sport, social responsibility and social finance. As part of a large EPOCH (heritage sector) EU funded project, he led the Europe-wide research on the socio-economic impact of heritage. He co-established and delivered several Heritage Impact conferences and co-organised with the CUBIST Research Group, EPOCH and UNESCO a symposium in Paris on the strategies and socio economic impact of heritage, which included senior members from UNESCO and experts in the field. His recent research is on network strategy and co-value creation and performance measurement. He is involved with developing management tools which integrate strategic decision making with socio-economic impact evaluation for social mission driven organisations, including heritage.

Dr Jaime Kaminski

Cultural Informatics Research Group, Brighton, UK

Jaime is a Senior Lecturer with the University of Brighton’s Cultural Informatics Research Group and the School of the Environment and Technology (Archaeology), where he specialises in the study of the socio-economic impact of heritage. He began his career as an archaeologist and has a PhD in archaeology from the University of Reading (1995). He has a long-standing research interest in all aspects of the management of heritage sites, and their social, economic and environmental impact. Additionally, his work for Brighton University’s Cultural Informatics Research Group covers aspects as diverse as heritage tourism, the sustainability of heritage sites and the impact of information and communication technologies in heritage. Jaime is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, the Royal Geographical Society and the Society of Antiquaries of London. Jaime is also a member of the ICOMOS-UK digital heritage committee, a trustee of the Sussex Archaeological Society, a former director of the Virtual Competence Centre for 3D in Cultural Heritage and an advisor to numerous heritage organisations, sites and projects.

Kevin Bacon

The Royal Pavilion & Museums, Brighton & Hove, UK

Kevin Bacon is Digital Manager at Royal Pavilion & Museums (RPM), where he has worked since 2003. Having previously worked in both front of house and as a curator, he became RPM’s first digital lead in 2011. In this role he has led numerous digital projects, including its online collections, in-gallery interactives, smartphone apps and RPM’s new website brightonmuseums.org.uk. Kevin holds an MA in Digital Media from the University of Sussex.

James Stevenson

Cultural Heritage Digitisation Ltd

James is a director of Cultural Heritage Digitisation Ltd. Prior to this his career was spent in photographic management in several high profile pubic institutions, notably at the V&A Museum, where he took the Photographic Studio through the transition from analogue to digital imaging. This was extended by adopting many multimedia services into the traditional ones undertaken by the Photographic Studio. He project managed the installation of the V&A digital asset Management system (VADAR) in 2005 and supervised its continuous development. The studio has been responsible for a high proportion of the museum’s unseen collection being made available to the public via museum publications and website. Currently there are 350,000 images of the collection visible on the V&A website, and 700,000 images on its internal DAM (Digital Asset Management) system. James was chairman of the Association for Fine Art and Historical Photography between 1999 and 2012.

Professor Ian Baxter

Director of Scottish Confucius Institute for Business & Communication, Heriot-Watt University and Professor of Historic Environment Management, University of Suffolk

Professor Ian Baxter originally trained as an archaeologist at Edinburgh University, and completed a PhD at the University of Cambridge investigating strategic management within heritage organisations. He has worked for a number of Universities, including the University of Cambridge (as Director of Public and Professional Programmes), and Glasgow Caledonian University (as Head of Department of Management and Director of Business School Postgraduate Programmes). He was Head of Suffolk Business School at UCS until September 2015, and remains with the University of Suffolk as a research supervisor and lecturer on specialist modules.

Dr Hafed Walda

Kings College London, UK

After gaining his batchelor's degree in his native Libya, Hafed came to the Institute of Archaeology in London where he obtained his doctorate in Roman Art and Archaeology. He has gained teaching and museum experience, and practical experience of excavations, using the latest methods, in rescue archaeology in London, and academically orientated excavations in classical Mediterranean sites, including Sparta, where he acted as Archaeology Co-ordinator. At the British Museum, on a two year appointment as Curator he co-ordinated the setting up of the new Roman Gallery (Room 70) which has become a focal point for many visitors to the Museum. During this period he used his experience to advise the Libyan Department of Antiquities in the creation of the new museum at Lepcis Magna. At King's College London as well as teaching courses in Roman Art, Roman Architecture and Introduction to Archaeology, he has played a key role in the development of the Daidalos database of the works of ancient Greek sculptors, a project that has attracted international interest. He has also directed excavations at Lepcis Magna.

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